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Health

Coronavirus in Wisconsin: 1,095 new cases, 40 deaths, 26,373 shots – WBAY

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin continued to see the 7-day averages decline Tuesday for new COVID-19 virus cases, deaths and hospitalizations.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported 40 deaths, the most in four days and following two days in the single digits. The 7-day average is down to 26 deaths per day but the death rate was 1.09% for a fifth day.

Milwaukee County reported 15 of the deaths. Sheboygan County reported 8. The rest were in Green Lake (2), Kenosha (4), La Crosse, Marinette, Outagamie (2), Portage, Racine, Rock, Walworth, Washington and Waukesha (2) counties.

The state also reported 1,095 new cases of the COVID-19 virus in the last 24-hour period. The 7-day average declined to 1,292 cases per day, the lowest since mid-September.

The positive results were more than one-third (34.41%) of the 3,182 results for people being tested or testing positive for the first time. The state hasn’t received this few tests since May 11, but now more than half of the state’s population has been tested at least once so first-time test results are harder to come by. The state also tracks results for people we’ve been tested more than once. By that measure, the DHS calculates the 7-day average for positivity was 5.1% on Monday. This calculation is a day behind because it’s based on preliminary numbers, including negative tests undergoing further review. Counting one test per person is considered a more reliable measure of the virus’s spread in the community and is how the CDC compiles its reports.

Sixty-three of Wisconsin’s 72 counties had new cases. Thirteen of these only had 1 or 2 new cases. County-by-county case and death totals appear later in this article.

VACCINATIONS

The DHS further reports 578,336 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered since mid-December. That’s 26,373 more shots than Monday’s report, including 15,638 shots given to people 65 and older. The state has given at least one shot to almost 22% of that population of older adults.

To date, 108,713 people received their final, second dose. That’s 7,162 more people fully vaccinated than Monday’s numbers. That’s approaching 2% of the state’s population. These numbers are preliminary as vaccinators’ reports come in, so they may include shots given over the last 1 to 3 days.

Age group Received at least 1 dose % of that age group
16-17 583 0.4%
18-24 21,260 3.8%
25-34 55,547 7.5%
35-44 62,689 8.8%
45-54 59,998 7.3%
55-64 65,542 8.4%
65+ 193,459 21.8%

Action 2 News has put together a guide of vaccination clinics and health agencies distributing the COVID-19 vaccine to people age 65 and older. CLICK HERE for locations and phone numbers and websites to register.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

For the first time in a week, the state had more than 100 hospitalizations in a 24-hour period for COVID-19. The DHS says 123 people were hospitalized, but the rolling 7-day average declined from 84 to 82 patients per day, thanks to taking last Tuesday’s 135 hospital admissions out of the equation.

To date, 24,460 people have been hospitalized at some point for serious COVID-19 symptoms, which is 4.49% of the state’s 544,260 known COVID-19 cases.

Taking the new admissions, discharges and deaths into account, the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) says there were 657 COVID-19 patients hospitalized overall, including 158 in intensive care on Tuesday. Compared to the day before, that’s 29 fewer patients overall but 12 more in ICU.

Fox Valley hospitals region were caring for 41 COVID-19 patients, including 6 in ICU. That’s 10 fewer patients than Monday, but the same number in ICU.

Northeast region hospitals were treating 73 COVID-19 patients, including 18 in ICU — 9 fewer patients overall and one less in intensive care than Monday.

HOSPITAL READINESS

In terms of hospital readiness, The WHA reported 273 ICU beds (18.6%) and 2,219 (19.9%) of all medical beds (ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation) are open in the state’s 134 hospitals.

The Fox Valley’s 13 hospitals have 12 ICU beds (11.5%) among them and 133 medical beds total (15.6%) open for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 32 ICU beds (15.5%) and 222 of all medical beds (23.2%) for patients in seven counties.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19. We use the term “open” instead of “available” because whether a bed can be filled depends on hospitals having the staff for a patient in that bed, including doctors, nurses and food services.

There were no hospital overflow patients or patients receiving outpatient Bamlanivimab infusion therapy Tuesday at the alternative care facility at State Fair Park.

SINCE FEBRUARY 5, 2020

The coronavirus was first diagnosed in Wisconsin in a patient in Madison one year ago this Friday. That patient was treated for symptoms and sent home to recover. Since then:

  • 3,057,017 people were tested for the coronavirus (this is 52.5% of the state’s population)
  • 2,512,757 tested negative
  • 544,260 tested positive
  • 5,937 people died from COVID-19
  • 520,325 people (95.6%) recovered
  • 17,809 cases (3.3%) are still active

TUESDAY’S COUNTY NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) *

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,511 cases (+1) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,148 cases (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 5,135 cases (+1) (71 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 1,038 cases (+2) (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 29,435 cases (+107) (197 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 1,275 cases (+5) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,110 cases (+3) (23 deaths)
  • Calumet – 5,264 cases (+5) (39 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 6,833 cases (80 deaths)
  • Clark – 3,105 cases (+2) (56 deaths)
  • Columbia – 4,851 cases (+4) (44 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,641 cases (+2) (16 deaths)
  • Dane – 38,085 cases (+65) (251 deaths)
  • Dodge – 11,174 cases (+10) (147 deaths)
  • Door – 2,354 cases (18 deaths)
  • Douglas – 3,596 cases (+33) (18 deaths)
  • Dunn – 4,074 cases (+7) (26 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 10,597 cases (+14) (98 deaths)
  • Florence – 426 cases (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 11,587 cases (+43) (84 deaths)
  • Forest – 914 cases (+3) (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,519 cases (+7) (79 deaths)
  • Green – 2,744 cases (+7) (13 deaths)
  • Green Lake – 1,492 cases (+1) (17 deaths) (+2)
  • Iowa – 1,800 cases (+1) (9 deaths)
  • Iron – 476 cases (19 deaths)
  • Jackson – 2,550 cases (+2) (22 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 7,607 cases (+20) (71 deaths)
  • Juneau – 2,889 cases (+3) (17 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 14,308 cases (+53) (275 deaths) (+4)
  • Kewaunee – 2,358 cases (+6) (26 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 11,774 cases (+21) (74 deaths) (+1)
  • Lafayette – 1,377 cases (7 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,892 cases (+1) (31 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,811 cases (+4) (55 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 6,960 cases (+9) (60 deaths)
  • Marathon – 13,336 cases (+23) (169 deaths)
  • Marinette – 3,912 cases (+8) (61 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 1,276 cases (+6) (21 deaths)
  • Menominee – 786 cases (+3) (11 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 95,255 (+177) (1,151 deaths) (+15)
  • Monroe – 4,098 cases (+4) (30 deaths)
  • Oconto – 4,165 cases (+5) (47 deaths)
  • Oneida – 3,215 cases (+8) (57 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 18,479 cases (+39) (183 deaths) (+2)
  • Ozaukee – 7,359 cases (+10) (72 deaths)
  • Pepin – 782 cases (+5) (7 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,338 cases (+12) (33 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,612 cases (+7) (42 deaths)
  • Portage – 6,194 cases (+29) (60 deaths) (+1)
  • Price – 1,105 cases (7 deaths)
  • Racine – 19,867 cases (+32) (300 deaths) (+1)
  • Richland – 1,232 cases (+2) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 13,822 cases (+29) (145 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk – 1,228 cases (15 deaths)
  • Sauk – 5,095 cases (+6) (36 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 1,420 cases (+3) (17 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,510 cases (+3) (69 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 12,474 cases (+11) (122 deaths) (+8)
  • St. Croix – 6,151 cases (+11) (41 deaths)
  • Taylor – 1,757 cases (20 deaths) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Trempealeau – 3,280 cases (+1) (36 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,744 cases (+6) (34 deaths)
  • Vilas – 1,967 cases (+4) (32 deaths)
  • Walworth – 8,623 cases (+33) (119 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 1,236 cases (+1) (18 deaths)
  • Washington – 13,317 cases (+31) (124 deaths) (+1)
  • Waukesha – 39,218 cases (+97) (448 deaths) (+2)
  • Waupaca – 4,632 cases (+6) (107 deaths)
  • Waushara – 2,046 cases (+2) (25 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 16,579 cases (+27) (169 deaths)
  • Wood – 6,439 cases (+13) (67 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger – 272 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga – 487 cases (31 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 701 cases (+4) (20 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,615 cases (63 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 2,098 cases (+2) (55 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 855 cases (17 deaths) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Houghton – 1,998 cases (+3) (32 deaths)
  • Iron – 854 cases (+2) (39 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 105 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 130 cases
  • Mackinac – 278 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette – 3,407 cases (53 deaths)
  • Menominee – 1,593 cases (+1) (33 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 335 cases (17 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 227 cases (+1) (4 deaths)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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