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Can people who had COVID-19 skip the second vaccine dose? – WCVB Boston

People who have had COVID-19 in the past should still continue to receive both doses of the two-shot COVID-19 vaccines, a Massachusetts doctor says.Dr. Todd Ellerin, with South Shore Health, explains that future research could change guidance currently offered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”If you’re following the science, the answer might be yes,” Ellerin says.”What we know is, after you get infected, that first dose of vaccine that you get almost acts like a booster. You can almost think of the infection that you get as the prime, or the first dose and then the first dose of vaccine you get is almost like the booster.”Ellerin says he wouldn’t be surprised if one day we say that a single vaccine may be enough after natural infection.He cautions, however, that the CDC does want everyone to get both doses. “Right now, the Centers for Disease Control still recommends that we get the full series of a vaccine because we know that the vaccine actually gives you a greater amount of antibodies, more than natural infection.””At this point, you still want your entire vaccine series, even though you’re thinking correctly and maybe one day that will change,” Ellerin says.Question: I got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but want the more effective Moderna or Pfizer. If available, can I get one of those?Dr. Sharon Wright, chief infection prevention officer at Beth Israel Lahey Health, says all three of the coronavirus vaccinations are “extremely effective” against severe disease, hospitalizations and death. “That’s what you really want from the vaccines,” Wright says. She says any one of the vaccines will protect people against COVID-19 and the variant strains of the disease. “I would not get re-vaccinated until, at such time, we’re all told we need boosters,” Wright says. Get the Facts on the Vax: Submit your vaccine questions for a doctor

People who have had COVID-19 in the past should still continue to receive both doses of the two-shot COVID-19 vaccines, a Massachusetts doctor says.

Dr. Todd Ellerin, with South Shore Health, explains that future research could change guidance currently offered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“If you’re following the science, the answer might be yes,” Ellerin says.

“What we know is, after you get infected, that first dose of vaccine that you get almost acts like a booster. You can almost think of the infection that you get as the prime, or the first dose and then the first dose of vaccine you get is almost like the booster.”

Ellerin says he wouldn’t be surprised if one day we say that a single vaccine may be enough after natural infection.

He cautions, however, that the CDC does want everyone to get both doses. “Right now, the Centers for Disease Control still recommends that we get the full series of a vaccine because we know that the vaccine actually gives you a greater amount of antibodies, more than natural infection.”

“At this point, you still want your entire vaccine series, even though you’re thinking correctly and maybe one day that will change,” Ellerin says.


Question: I got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, but want the more effective Moderna or Pfizer. If available, can I get one of those?

Dr. Sharon Wright, chief infection prevention officer at Beth Israel Lahey Health, says all three of the coronavirus vaccinations are “extremely effective” against severe disease, hospitalizations and death.

“That’s what you really want from the vaccines,” Wright says.

She says any one of the vaccines will protect people against COVID-19 and the variant strains of the disease.

“I would not get re-vaccinated until, at such time, we’re all told we need boosters,” Wright says.

Get the Facts on the Vax: Submit your vaccine questions for a doctor

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